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Difference between case study and ethnographic study

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Case studies and ethnographies are two popular detailed, qualitative studies used in the field of social science. Although there are certain similarities between these two methods such as their holistic nature, and the extended time period, there are also some differences between the two. The main difference between case study and ethnography is their focus; ethnography aims to explore cultural phenomenon whereas case studies aim to describe the nature of phenomena through a detailed investigation of individual cases. This article explains, 1.

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Case study and phenomenology are two terms that are often used in the field of social science s and research. Both these terms refer to types of research methods ; however, phenomenology is also a concept in philosophical studies. As a research methodology, the main difference between case study and phenomenology is that case study is an in-depth and detailed investigation of the development of a single event, situation, or an individual over a period of time whereas phenomenology is a study that is designed to understand the subjective, lived experiences and perspectives of participants. What is the difference between Case Study and Phenomenology. In simple terms, it is an in-depth and detailed investigation of the development of a single event, situation, or an individual over a period of time.

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The differences between phenomenological and ethnographic research are numerous. Phenomenological research seeks to understand the subjective, lived experiences and perspectives of participants. This kind of research is individualistic and provides the researcher with information regarding a persons unique experience. Ethnographic research focuses more on the collectivistic experiences within a certain culture.
At the surface it may seem like ethnography and standard interviewing are similar: a moderator sits with a participant, asks a series of questions and receives a series of answer. Nothing much to it, right? There are several subtle yet incredibly important nuances that separate ethnography from your standard interviews.